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2022-05-14 23:52:22 By : Ms. Lily Huang

Kensington Derby and Arts Festival, Ardmore Restaurant Week, Exit 0 Jazz Festival, and more.

📅 Our calendar is updated every Thursday with the best events for the week. You can always find it at inquirer.com/calendar. Submit an event to our calendar here.

(Community / in-person / free / multiday) We are still in a pandemic, and variants are a concern. Make a plan to get vaccinated or your booster shot; there are many places throughout Pennsylvania and New Jersey — CVS, Rite Aid, neighborhood rec centers, and more — where you can get your free COVID-19 shot. (Free, phila.gov)

(Food / in-person / multiday) Bring your appetite to this two-week-long celebration of Ardmore’s dining scene. Take your pick from more than a dozen tasty restaurants and enjoy prix fixe menus ranging from $20 to $40. With offerings from sushi at Osushi to Venezuelan flavors at Autana, there’s bound to be something for every taste bud. ($20-$40, May 12-22, Various restaurants, destinationardmore.com)

(Art / in-person / community) The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts’ walls will be taken over by the work of graduate and undergraduate art students for its annual student exhibition. This tradition offers the artists the chance to curate and sell their own work and for art enthusiasts to purchase one-of-a-kind pieces at a lower price point. Enjoy a pay-what-you-wish rate to the exhibit during opening weekend, May 13 to 15. Otherwise, general admission gets you access. ($10-$18, May 13-June 5, 118-128 N. Broad St., pafa.org)

(Seasonal / in-person / kid-friendly / community) Bring your home garden to life with locally sourced starter plants and vegetables. Grab everything from gorgeous flowers to hearty herbs at Grumblethorpe’s spring plant sale. Proceeds support youth programming at Grumblethorpe and Philalandmarks. (May 13-14, 5267 Germantown Ave., freedomsbackyard.com)

(Music / in-person / multiday) The spring 2022 edition of the Exit 0 Jazz Festival takes place over three days in Cape May this weekend. The lineup is impressive, with the Mingus Big Band playing on the 100th anniversary month of Charles Mingus’ birth, vocalist extraordinaire Cecile McLorin Salvant, sax great Charles Lloyd, singer Kurt Elling with guitarist Charlie Hunter (who also play Sunday at Ardmore Music Hall), and brass band Snacktime Philly, among others. ($65-$85, May 13-15, various venues in Cape May, exitzerojazzfestival.com)

(Music / in-person) The long-running Philly punk band fronted by Rodney Anonymous named after Milkman Dead, the protagonist of Toni Morrison’s 1977 novel Song of Solomon, is headlining a triple bill in Atlantic City. Also on the bill: Fellow punk veterans Decontrol and alt-rock trio Gibbous Moon. ($22.50, May 13, 8 p.m., 247 S. New York Ave., Atlantic City, anchorrockclub.com)

(Movie / in-person) It’s been nearly 40 years since Drew Barrymore set fires with her mind. In this remake, Ryan Kiera Armstrong takes on the role of Charlie McGee and Zac Efron plays her … dad. Based on the novel by Stephen King. (Rated R. Premieres May 13 in theaters and streaming on Peacock)

(Movie / virtual) Rebel Wilson plays a former cheerleader who wakes from a 20-year coma with the goal of finishing what she started. So she returns to high school with the hope of becoming a 37-year-old prom queen. With Justin Hartley and Alicia Silverstone. Directed by Alex Hardcastle (Grace and Frankie). (Rated R. Premieres May 13 on Netflix)

(Seasonal / in-person / kid-friendly) Prepare for a day of street eats, live music and, of course, lots of booze at this festival outside of Hawthornes. The music lineup features Snacktime Philly, The Mini Q’s, DJ Adrian Hardy, and more. Look out for $6 local craft brews plus ciders, seltzers and wine along with food from local food trucks. (May 14, 11 a.m.-7 p.m., 11th Street from Fitzwater to Catherine St., hawthornecafe.com)

At Chester County’s annual Styer’s Festival of the Peony, you can walk through 25 acres containing more than 55,000 peonies and a large selection of precut flowers to take home. There are more than 100 peony varieties, such as coral charm, glowing candle, sally, and red charm. While the peony fields are beautiful on foot, Styer’s also has a drive-through option for anyone who wants to keep their walking to a minimum. During the festival, you can also order fresh-cut flowers and bulbs for delivery. ($8-$20, May 14-31, 4313 S. Creek Rd., Chadds Ford, styerspeonies.com)

(Theater / in-person) Mister Rogers’ theme song sets the scene for a “Grr-ific!” hour-long performance (with 15-minute intermission) by the young animal and human residents of the Neighborhood of Make Believe. Previous reviewers claim they “ugga-mugga’d” the show. Ages 3-5. ($29-$79, May 14, 2 p.m., 250 S. Broad St., kimmelculturalcampus.org)

(Festival / seasonal / in-person / outdoors / free) Trenton Ave. brings back the mud for an annual street fest centered around locally made inventions that roll, race, and parade. The wacky derby (1 p.m.) is the highlight, but there’s live music and food and drink vendors all day, including Mr. Softee and Pink’s Cold Treats. Ages 3+. (Free, May 14, noon-6 p.m., Trenton Ave., Frankford Ave. to E. Norris St., kensingtonkineticarts.org)

(Music / in-person / community / free) Step up to the mic and let Skeletor (from Masters of the Universe) judge your musical talents. If your skills are strong, you’ll make it through — but if not, prepare to get the gong. (Free, May 14, 9 p.m., 3025 Walnut St., wl.seetickets.us)

(Community / in-person / kid-friendly) Your favorite game characters are coming to life and taking over Cherry Street Pier. Come hang out with other game fanatics and enjoy cosplaying, vendors, game-playing, and more. (Free entry, $10-$15 for tournaments, May 14, 11 a.m.-6 p.m., 121 N. Columbus Blvd., cherrystreetpier.com)

(Community / in-person / shopping) This day-long block party features more than 40 vendors selling everything from art to wearable goods, plus plenty of food trucks, live music and beer from local breweries (Love City, Roy Pitz, Yards, and Triple Bottom Brewing). (May 14, noon-8 p.m., springarts.com)

(Magic / comedy / in-person) If you’ve ever tied up a bunch of balloons, your worn-out fingers will marvel at Cassidy’s, which hold world-speed records for balloon sculpting. What’s more, he does it while cracking jokes, performing magic, and not even swearing. Ages 2-12. ($12, May 14, 1 p.m., 24 W. Temple Ave., Sellersville, st94.com)

(Art / in-person / community) Flight, a new series of murals that explore what life would be like if Black people could fly, will go up across the city this spring. Kick off this inspiring art installation, which is presented by the African American Museum and Mural Arts, with a community discussion and celebration. You’ll hear readings from local poets and writers, and learn how you could become a potential mural subject. ($10-$14, May 14, 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m., 701 Arch St., aampmuseum.org)

(Outdoors / in-person / community) Need a little animal therapy? Spend 45 minutes of your week hiking through Wissahickon Valley Park surrounded by the cutest goats you’ve ever seen. You’ll get the chance to walk a goat along the trail and get some quality cuddles when the hike is done. ($25, May 15, 10:30-11:30 a.m., 8986 Crefeld St., eventbrite.com)

(Nature / in-person / outdoors) So this isn’t for kids, exactly … Instead, it’s a class to help parents understand the health benefits of adding nature to childhood. Mt. Cuba’s Kathy Andrzejewski leads a lesson in outdoor activity-creating. The session comes with a coupon to come back with your kid. Adults only. ($59, May 15, 1-3 p.m., 3120 Barley Mill Rd., Hockessin, Del., mtcubacenter.org)

(Music / in-person) It’s been 50 years since Will The Circle Be Unbroken, a 1972 album that featured legends like Mother Maybelle Carter and Roy Acuff mingling with a new generation of folk and country singers. The only two Nitty Gritty Dirt Band original members remaining are singer Jeff Hanna and drummer Jimmy Fadden. This summer, the band will release Dirt Does Dylan with guests Jason Isbell, Steve Earle and Rosanne Cash, and they’re playing the American Music Theatre in Lancaster on Friday and City Winery Philadelphia on Sunday. ($65-$95, May 15, 8 p.m., 990 Filbert St., citywinery.com/philadelphia)

(Music / in-person) Who are Joe Sumner’s Friends? This show will be the fifth in a week for the son of Gordon Sumner — otherwise known as Sting. The singer-songwriter opened for his dad at the Met Philly this past week, will again at the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino in Atlantic City on May 13 and 14. This Milkboy Philly gig will be a much more intimate affair with openers Sharing Contest, the Philly indie duo of Sam Ansa and Alex Fichera. ($12, May 16, 8 p.m., 1100 Chestnut St., milkboyphilly.com)

(Community / in-person / free) This game night at Redcap’s Corner was designed with trans, autistic, and neurodivergent folks in mind. Come hang out, socialize and play a few games. All are welcome to hang out, play and have a bit of fun. (Free, May 17, 6-9 p.m., 3850 Lancaster Ave., universitycity.org)

(Music / in-person) Bob Log is a masked man. Or rather, a helmeted one. The slide guitar-playing one-man band based in Tucson, Arizona, and Melbourne, Australia hides his true identity under his motorcycle helmet and plays Silvertone guitars while wearing a full-body cannonball suit. Philadelphia psychedelic gospel-rock band St. James & the Apostles open. ($15, May 17, 8 p.m., 1201 N. Frankford Ave., johnnybrendas.com)

(Music / in-person) London band Dry Cleaning are principal players in the new wave of British bands that includes Yard Act and Wet Leg (who are the poppiest of the bunch) partial to spoken-sung lyrics and jagged guitar lines that recall first-generation post-punk acts like Wire and Gang of Four. Scratchcard Lanyard is the track in which droll, acerbic frontwoman Florence Shaw repeats “do everything, feel nothing” like a mantra from the band’s New Long Leg debut. ($30, May 17, 8 p.m., 2125 Chestnut St., r5productions.com)

(Music / in-person) Japanese psych-rock band Kikagaku Moyo formed in 2012 when founders Go Kurosawa and Tomo Katsurado were college students in the U.S. Their music is an international mash-up of influences, from German techno to Indian classical music. The now Amsterdam-based band’s new album Kumoyo Island is purportedly their last. Philly-based electronic composer Nina Ryser opens. ($20, May 18, 8 p.m., 1026 Spring Garden St., utphilly.com)

(Music / in-person) Chino Moreno-fronted Sacramento alt-metal band are 27 years out from Adrenaline, the 1995 debut album that made them hard-rock heroes at the tail end of the grunge era. They’re on the road in support of their 2020 album Ohms. French metal band Gojira opens. ($115-$450, May 18, 7 p.m., 858 N. Broad St., metphilly.com)

(Music / in-person) Perky pop-punk band Beach Bunny found a teenage audience via the TikTok success of the body image-conscious title cut to their 2018 EP Prom Queen. The band’s second album, Emotional Creature, is due on Mom + Pop Records in July. ($25, May 18, 8 p.m., 29 E. Allen St., thefillmorephilly.com)

(Music / in-person) London-born Sudanese American singer Ahmed Galab — a.k.a. Sinkane — plays a full band show at the Brooklyn Bowl. Two DJs are opening: James Murphy of LCD Soundsystem and Dave P. of Philly’s Making Time dance parties. ($20, May 18, 8 p.m., 1009 Canal St., brooklynbowl.com/philadelphia)

» READ MORE: Find the best kids events in our weekly kids calendar

(Music / in-person) The Nottingham, England post-punk duo of Jason Williamson and Andrew Fearn are a hip-hop band of sorts whose music connects back to punk-era politically acute acts. Their spot-on sixth album, Spare Ribs, is an inventive, truly populist affair that aligns with the have-nots and flips the bird to the ruling classes with gusto and wit. ($22.50, May 19, 8 p.m., 29 E. Allen St., thefillmorephilly.com)

(Musical / in-person / multiday) One way to get Encanto out of their heads: Re-introduce them to Maui, Moana and that creepy giant crab, singing songs by Lin Manuel-Miranda and imparting ocean dreams. Ages 3-11. ($10-$20, weekends, through May 15, 825 Walnut St., walnutstreettheatre.org)

(Education / virtual / multiday / kid-friendly / free) Through dad jokes, real talk, and superb listening, Mr. Maurice connects with his students — and connects students to each other. Each workshop appeals to specific audiences: Black boys, young teens, future entrepreneurs, sports fans, home cooks and more. Workshops teach some writing and lots of life lessons. Ages 8+ (Free, Jan 19, 20, 21-May. 26, 27, 28, mightywriters.org)

(Seasonal / in-person / multiday) For 228 years, the farm one hour’s drive up Broad Street from City Hall has raised crops. In more recent years, Hellerick’s has also raised agritainment-based fun with an obstacle course, ziplines, goat yoga, you-pick crops, party packages galore, and, new this season, a silo climbing wall. The farm is open on weekends only through Memorial Day. Ages 2+. (Prices vary, weekends only, through May 30, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., 5500 N. Easton Rd., Doylestown, hellericksfarm.com)

(Seasonal / in-person / multiday / outdoors) With a roof of inflated beach balls, the warm weather version of City Hall’s ice rink is back, inaugurated by the local rollers of Great on Skates. The outdoor roller skating rink promises activations through the spring and summer — and an adjacent beer garden. Reservations recommended. Ages 3+. ($10 adult, $8 child, $5 skate rental, opening: 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. and 6-8 p.m., daily through July 17, 1 S. 15th St., centercityphila.org)

(Science / in-person / multiday) The Academy continues a year focused on water with an exhibit co-created by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. Things that live and happen on the ocean floor — five-foot-long tubeworms, thermal vents, giant clams, iconic shipwrecks — could inspire kids to become the next Cousteau (and likely inspire grown-ups to rewatch The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou). Ages 5+. ($22 ages 13 and up, $19 senior, student, military, $18 ages 2-12, $2 ACCESS cardholder, free under age 2, through Jul. 24, 1900 Benjamin Franklin Pkwy., ansp.org)

(Museum / in-person / multiday / kid-friendly) The museum version of J.K. Rowling’s juggernaut lets visitors choose their Hogwarts houses, explore Gringotts, Hogwarts, and the Forbidden Forest — but not record video. Timed tickets are good for museum admission up to two hours early. Ages 5 and up. ($43 ages 12-64, $41 senior and military, $39 ages 3-11; free ages 2 & under, evening tickets: $30, through Sept. 18, 222 N. 20th St., harrypotterexhibition.com)

(Fitness / in-person / outdoors) Head to the Schuylkill Banks for a morning of zen movement. Bring your own yoga mat or towel and enjoy this all-levels instructor-led yoga class. Yoga classes take place (weather permitting) on Saturday and Sundays at 10 a.m., and Tuesday and Thursdays at 6 p.m. throughout the spring and summer season. (Pay what you can, various dates through Oct., 2500 Locust St., eventbrite.com)

(Art / in-person / outdoors / free) Magical Fantasy, a collection of bold and bright 3D art pieces by London-based artist Morag Myerscough, has transformed The Navy Yard into a colorful playground. Stop by to wander through the exhibit and escape into an abstract dreamland without leaving the city. (Free, through October, Broad St. and Constitution Ave., navyyard.org)

(Outdoors / multiday / kid-friendly / free) Philly’s oldest research garden has teamed up with the Bicycle Coalition to lend, repair, and teach kids about bikes every Friday after school. There are snacks, too. Ages 5-17. (Free, Fridays through Nov., 3-6 p.m., 5400 Lindbergh Blvd., bartramsgarden.org)

» READ MORE: How to do everything better right now: A collection of our most useful stories

Amber Burns is a writer and content creator living in Philadelphia. When she’s not writing, you can usually find her holed up in a coffee shop with a good book. Find her on social media @byamberburns.

Lauren McCutcheon is a Philadelphian, parent, and local writer. She writes about kids events for The Inquirer, including our Kids Calendar, which publishes each Sunday.

Howard Gensler writes about movies for The Inquirer, and is a former entertainment editor and writer for the Philadelphia Daily News. His work has also appeared in Premiere magazine, and he wrote the story on which the movie Hysteria, starring Maggie Gyllenhaal and Hugh Dancy, was based.

Dan DeLuca is the music critic for The Inquirer.

Candis McLean contributed to this article.